News: A Replica Of Apple’s Sponsored Porsche 935 On Sale For $499,000

A Replica Of Apple’s Sponsored Porsche 935 On Sale For $499,000

News Desk By News Desk
April 28, 2020
1 comments

Everybody knows Apple; it’s the world’s most valuable brand, worth more than $200 billion (yes, with a ‘b’), and you’re probably reading this article on one of their products even as we speak. But what you might not remember is that the company had a brief foray into auto racing, and now’s your chance to own a nod to that past with this replica Porsche.

Then known as ‘Apple Computer’, the company sponsored a 1979 Porsche 935 K3 with a rainbow livery matching its then colorful logo. It only raced for one year, in 1980, under the Dick Barbour Racing banner with middling results, including an outing at the 24 Hours of Le Mans where it retired after 13 hours. But it apparently was great for exposure for the fledgling computer company and became a fan favorite at La Sarthe.

Just so we’re clear, this is not that car; the original is in the private collection of Adam Carolla. But this replica is still a serious racing car, with many GT2 parts and components such as the 3.8-liter twin-turbocharged flat six, six-speed transmission and a double wish-bone 993 rear suspension module. Making 700hp and with a top speed of more than 200mph / 320kph, this car is advertised to be competitive in classic racing, including the Daytona Classic 24.

You might think the $499,000 asking price for this replica is steep, but considering Carolla paid $4.84 million for his original Porsche 935 several years ago, and that it’s now estimated at around $10 million, this would be a far easier way to get into classic racing. Think of the exposure!

*Images courtesy of Atlantis Motor Group and digitaldtour / Vintage Race Photography

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Bastien Schnock Recent comment authors
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Bastien Schnock
Bastien Schnock

You probably mean 1 trillion USD , not 200 billion?