Market Finds: American Muscle Cars for (Almost) Every Budget, On Sale Now

American Muscle Cars for (Almost) Every Budget, On Sale Now

Petrolicious Productions By Petrolicious Productions
December 3, 2014
6 comments

From the Hemi’s, fastback’s, and big block’s heyday, America built some spectacular machines known as muscle cars. All while the muscle car religion has many adherents, Mopar, General Motors, and Ford folks all agree on the basic ingredients: a big engine stuffed in a relatively light package, but differ when it comes to the execution. This week we cautiously group these brands together in a wide range of American muscle cars for all budgets available now.

The car: 1969 Dodge Charger R/T

Price: $85,900

Location: Hartville, Ohio, USA

Seller’s Info: Click here

Remember the muscle car from the movie Bullitt? No, not Steve McQueen’s Ford Mustang fastback; the menacing baddies’ 1968 Charger R/T. This Mopar may not be the one from the film but has been fully restored to show quality. It’s equipped with a four speed manual transmission, Dana rear-end, and all new wiring. The seller claims this Charger has 375 ponies under the hood.

The car: 1968 Chevrolet Camaro SS

Price: $25,000

Location: Chicago, Illinois, USA

Seller’s Info: Click here

One of the most iconic muscle cars is the first-generation Camaro. This 1968 SS was recently restored with only 45,000 miles on the chassis. The seller acquired the car in Arizona and claims it’s rust free. The Camaro is equipped with the 327 cubic inch V8 and automatic transmission.

The car: 1963 Ford Galaxie 500

Price: $15,900

Location: Daytona Beach, Florida, USA

Seller’s Info: Click here

The Galaxie helped usher in the muscle car era in the early 1960s. Competing with the Impala, the Galaxie was Ford’s full-size model available as a wagon, four-door, coupe, or convertible. This factory muscle car is equipped with a 390 big block, four speed manual transmission, power steering, and power brakes.

The car: 1968 Mercury Montego

Price: $2513 (Current Bid, $4900 BiN)

Location: Damascus, Maryland, USA

Seller’s Info: Click here

Chances are, the younger you didn’t say, “When I grow up I will drive a 1968 Mercury Montego.” Although the Montego won’t headline your favorite muscle car auction, they represent a genre of affordable American iron that still provides that V8 rumble. This Torino cousin has 81,773 miles, factory air conditioning, and an upgraded ignition.

The car: 1981 Pontiac Trans Am

Price: $7311 (Current Bid)

Location: Charlotte, North Carolina, USA

Seller’s Info: Click here

While attempting to avoid referencing Burt Reynolds, we present the Firebird Trans Am. The second-generation Firebird was produced for eleven years giving us plenty of inventory to choose from. If you buy a Ferrari it should be red, if you buy a Trans Am it should be black like this one with a screaming chicken on the hood. This Fire-chicken has been freshened over the last several years with new paint and several interior components replaced. It’s equipped with snowflake wheels and of course, the bird.

If you know of a great, stylish car for sale and would like us to feature it, please let us know!

Petrolicious makes no claim as to the accuracy of the information contained in the car’s original listing, nor will it be held responsible for any errors in said information. If you’re interested in any of these cars, do your homework and research extensively before you buy.

Join the Conversation
Related

Leave a Reply

Pete McLachlan
Pete McLachlan

A pet peeve of mine is the over use of the term “muscle car”. Muscle cars are technically compact or medium sized cars that were built from the factory using big honking V8 motors intended for full sized cars. A case in point would be that my ’67 Cougar with a 289 is [i][u]not[i][u] a muscle car, even though it is tweaked to put out in excess of 300hp. [i][u]If[/u][/i] it had a big block FE 390 fitted from the assembly plant it would be a muscle car. As it is, the correct term is “pony car”, although if it… Read more »

olddavid
olddavid

The Charger is a car that has been over-restored at an unexpected cost that the owner foolishly expects to recoup. The only way it is worth that money is if it has numbers matching Hemi, and then it may be worth even more than the quoted $85k. A wise rule of thumb is never restore a car with profit in mind. Whether you attempt to do it on the cheap, or reproduce even the factory chalk marks authentic, it will not be worth what you have spent. There are exceptions, but they are usually seven figure rarities with reams of… Read more »

olddavid
olddavid

I just clicked the link and had my suspicions confirmed. I feel kind of sorry for the guy, he had the best of intentions, but I do not understand a restoration of a garden variety car that probably had 50,000 copies made that year. To go batshit crazy to the extent of date coding and replicating wire markings and wipers should be reserved for a Deusenberg SJ or a 300 SL, not a Dodge Charger. I would bet that it is superior in every way to one that came off the line with zero miles.

New to America
New to America

Why is the Charger $85,900 ?
Are they rare ?
High performance ?

TJ Martin
TJ Martin

Hmmmn . Well first off … with four out of the five you’ve missed the most important detail . The engine size as well as which engine is it . Without that calling any of the four a muscle car may be in fact incorrect at best . On the fifth [ the SS ] though you’re giving the cubic inches you’re still not saying WHICH 327 it is [ pedestrian 2bbl 327 ? mildly tuned 4bbl 327 ? wild 4bbl 327 ? Full factory tuned 327 ? ] Thats the thing you’ve got to remember when it comes to… Read more »

Carlo
Carlo

Nice article. Thanks. Those are snowflake wheels on the Trans AM not honeycomb which were found on the earlier models.