Journal: Giovanni Michelotti was a Prolific, Masterful Designer

Giovanni Michelotti was a Prolific, Masterful Designer

Benjamin Shahrabani By Benjamin Shahrabani
October 15, 2014
13 comments

Photography by Josh Clason, David Marvier, and Ezekiel Wheeler

Like many sons following in their father’s footsteps, Giovanni Michelotti, born in Torino in 1921, seemed destined to follow in his. At the time of his birth, the elder Michelotti was already a machine shop manager at the Torino-based carmaker Itala’s engine factory, so it seems little coincidence that the younger Michelotti would come to develop a deep love of all things mechanical, especially cars.

Leaving school at just fifteen-years-old, Michelotti garnered his first experience in the automotive industry as an apprentice at the Stabilimenti Farina in Cambiano, just outside his hometown. If that name seems familiar, it is because the nascent design house, and the best car-design “school” existing at the time, was started by the older brother of Battista “Pinin” Farina. Today the firm is called Pininfarina S.p.A, and still in operation. It was there that Michelotti’s talent was nurtured, if not recognized at first. In this golden age of coach building, and just two years into his apprenticeship, Michelotti’s first credited design was a body design for a Lancia Astura, in 1938. The project, however, was not meant to be, and never put into production. Michelotti continued to churn out sketches, though. It would be a little while, but Farina would eventually put Michelotti’s designs for a re-bodied 1947 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 into production, and soon thereafter a series of designs based on the Talbot T-26. The success of having cars derived from his work was the motivation that Michelotti needed to strike out on his own. He would establish his own studio, Studio Technico e Carrozzeria G. Michelotti, Torino in 1949.

Michelotti would continue to work freelance for several Italian Carrozzerias, including Bertone, Ghia, Allemano, and Vignale. His first commission as an independent designer was a body for a variant based on the Ferrari 166, which would become just the first of many Ferraris he penned throughout his career. Throughout the 1950s, he would work on designs for Maserati, Lancia, and Alfa Romeo as well. Bodies for the Ferrari 212 Inter, Ferrari 340 Mexico Coupe, Maserati 3500GT, Lancia Aurelia, and Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Veloce would flow from his hand, and oh, what a hand it was. While Michelotti is now considered the father of freelance car design, it is also said that he would create the first sketches in one day and night only working with his pencils.

Michelotti’s career would take an interesting turn toward the end of the ’50s, as he essentially became the house designer for British carmaker, Standard Triumph. This came about when he penned a proposal to shape the 1956 Standard Vanguard, a sedan design that represented a total break with Standard’s conservatively designed cars. And so, from the late 1950s Michelotti was responsible for all the new models produced by Standard Triumph, starting with the Standard Vanguard and going on through models such as the Herald, Spitfire, GT6, TR4, and TR4A 2000, 1300. Later the Triumph Stag, and Dolomite would be added to the list. Nothing like a bit of Italian panache to spice up a staid British manufacturer, right?

Michelotti also made big contributions at BMW too–the BMW 700, the “New Class” BMW 1600-2, and, later, the now highly-collectable 2002. A pagoda-style roof added to an OSCA study later ended up gracing the Mercedes–Benz SL class. The Japanese manufacturers contracted him to draw up the Hino Contessa and Daihatsu Sport during the 1960s. Other customers for Michelotti’s work included DAF, Fiat, and Ford, but he also found some spare time to produce a few cars under its own name. One of the few was the “Shellette”, a beach car with wicker seats and dashboard, like the Fiat Jolly.

Michelotti is credited with more that 1,200 designs–cars, and even buses and trucks–where at least one model was produced. The quality, quantity, and breadth of his work are just some of the reasons why he was inducted into the European Automotive Hall of Fame in 2009. Over the years, Michelotti declined numerous offers to join other coachbuilders because he was valued his independence as a freelancer, and the varied challenges they allowed. Michelotti passed away too soon in 1980, at the age of just 59. Carrozzeria Michelotti closed its doors in 1993.

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13 Comments on "Giovanni Michelotti was a Prolific, Masterful Designer"

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James Toal
James Toal

This was his 1960s truck for Scammell, part of British Leyland trucks

Ian Miles
Ian Miles

Used to be driven to school in a 2002. It was a really lovely car, quite quirky, bold design and solid quality. If you compare this to the Alpine, they are chalk and cheese. The true worth of a designer is in his ability to be diverse and radical in his designs.

John Jankura
John Jankura

My personal favorite!

John Jankura
John Jankura

My personal favorite!

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John F Jones
John F Jones

Benjamin, what a helpful piece! Michelotti is deeply underrated given his input and influence with such a variety of marques, and the incredible durability of his work (the 2002 and A310 remain fresh). Can you recommend a source for me to learn more about the man? Did you have to dig through a lot of source material to cull these details? Again, helpful article, thank you.

Paul Harvey
Paul Harvey
Michelotti was most closely associated with Vignale, and worked there full time for a while while still running his ‘own’ practice. Most of the Vignale work through the 50’s and 60’s was by Michelotti, and the connection with Standard Triumph started through that connection – the Triumph Herald and Triumph Italia both carry unique crossed ‘flag’ badges where the red cross (‘V’ for Vignale) actually precedes the blue diamond (‘S’ for Standard triumph) with both cars designed by Giovanni Michelotti. Only when Standard Triumph were taken over by British Leyland who promptly reneged on their agreements with overseas car makers… Read more »
Rob Jackson
Rob Jackson

Triumph TRS.. Terribly, raunchily sexy!
Google “Triumph Conrero coupé, Michelotti” and be blown away..

Jono51
Jono51

The Spitfire is a great work of art – possibly his best, although the TR4-5 is my own favourite.

Peter
Peter

When I was 7 years old I saw my first Triumph Spitfire on the streets of Denver. I was instantly transfixed by its subtle feminine lines and graceful yet sporting execution. The car is often overlooked, but if you google images of the Spitfire, you can see Michelotti’s dominating genius at work. And all those amazing lines in a car not much bigger than a go-kart. Every time I go for a drive in my Spitfire MMIV, I am paY Tibute to this automotive Michelangelo. Thanks for recognizing him Petricious, and thanks for the well-written piece.

Byron Andrews
Byron Andrews

The Alpine A110 is one of my favorite classics out there. Love the rear engine and the extreme lightweight and agility it has. And it simply looks astounding to me

Dustin Rittle
Dustin Rittle

Talk about a underrated designer! That BMW and Alpine look simply amazing. Keep up the good work Petrolicious.

TJ Martin
TJ Martin

When looking over the list of iconic and iconoclastic beauties Michelotti designed … saying he passed away too soon rapidly becomes the understatement of the month !

Matthew Lange ; FYI – ” Everybody knows that ! ” Not really though . Just a bit of friendly pop culture infected ribbing 😮

Matthew Lange
Matthew Lange

Never realised Michelotti designed the A110.

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