Journal: Somebody Recreated A Lincoln Continental Entirely In Cardboard, And It’s Amazing

Somebody Recreated A Lincoln Continental Entirely In Cardboard, And It’s Amazing

Michael Banovsky By Michael Banovsky
November 6, 2015
6 comments

Photography via Shannon Goff

At 19 feet long, Miles To Empty is a massive sculpture.

Of course, the choice of vehicle, color, and medium are inspired choices—after all, there’s probably no better car to support a solo show than a 1979 Lincoln Continental Mark V. But the reason for picking this subject elevates Shannon Goff’s latest work from a gallery curiosity into a genuinely thought-provoking piece.

Goff’s grandfather owned the same car, and as a child she recalls happy memories from drives with her family. Now, it’s the perfect vehicle to convey a simple message about the impact of technology on industry, specifically the assembly line. A Detroit native, it clearly shows the skill required to manufacture a vehicle like this, piece by piece, each paper part made specifically for this purpose. Compared to when this car was made, production lines have become highly automated—and traditional craftsmanship has all but been erased from many processes.

With only an inviting brown wood steering wheel to float as contrast over a ghostly white shape, it’s just a shame it won’t ever see the open road.

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Matthew Lange
Matthew Lange

Very cool

Fingers
Fingers

That’s impressive, a backfire could be fatal though!

Mark Jansen
Mark Jansen

Why?

Tom DesRochers
Tom DesRochers

Childhood memories, Mr. Jansen. That’s why.
Same reason I still have the Maverick that was my first car.

Amazing work, Ms. Goff. I had a next door neighbor that owned one of these. Love those big old land yachts. Not enough to buy one, but I still love them.

Shannon Goff
Shannon Goff

Hello…i thought you may like to know that the the steering wheel is cardboard not wood. Photo credit: PDRearick

Dan Picasso
Dan Picasso

Brilliant idea, brilliant execution.