Travel: Tell Us About Your Greatest Road Trip

Tell Us About Your Greatest Road Trip

By Yoav Gilad
March 7, 2014
30 comments

Photography by David Marvier for Petrolicious

My family took me on my first road trip, at about two years old, when we drove the 1750 miles (about 2800km) from Washington DC to Central Florida and back to see a mouse named Mickey and his empire. I don’t remember the trip but I suspect the sustained motion became so deeply ingrained that it’s part of the reason I have a passion for long tours today.

After getting my license, I hit the road myself taking trips to closer spots at first, cities like Philadelphia, New York and Norfolk often with friends and without parental consent. I always had the music cranked and was usually in a brown-leather flat cap and sunglasses. I got so good at making the run from DC to NY that I could be through the Baltimore harbor tunnel and in Manhattan in two hours flat.

But my favorite road trip has to be cruising Spain from Madrid down to Sevilla via Gibraltar. I was in a crappy rental car but that didn’t matter as I had my beautiful then-girlfriend, now fiancé, with me and we were flying down Spain’s nearly deserted highways. We’d cruise stretches of up to ten miles without encountering another car. Needless to say, we discovered the car’s top speed easily. Slicing through the hot summer countryside, we’d exit when hungry, needed fuel, or to skip through a particularly picturesque village.

In one town, nuns famous for their baked goods managed to upsell us some day-old communion wafers. We paid, found a park, sat down and opened the bag. After taking a single bite, we started laughing uncontrollably. I had been expecting some sort of yummy Spanish snack. It was immediately apparent why the bag was so, so large and so incredibly cheap. The pigeons had no complaints however.

I don’t think we turned the radio on the whole trip, in contrast to my usual driving modus operandi. The scenery entertained us: clear Mediterranean skies above sharp cliffs and deep ravines hundreds of feet below. It was all new to us and we were drunk off of the novelty, beauty, and thrill. The highway was fresh, fast, and sunny. Plus the other drivers we did encounter knew to stay right. My fiancé was busy trying to snap photos of Spain’s bull billboards as the needle topped 180 km/h. In the future, we need a longer lens, as the photos were all blurry.

I’ll never forget coming around a corner and seeing Toledo’s walls high atop the Tajo River. The entire trip is wonderfully, permanently etched into my memory.

We’d love to hear about our Petrolisti’s best road trips so please share yours… Was there a new vista, romance or a combination of amazing roads and car? 

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Tim B
Tim B
8 years ago

I have a more comprehensive, pictorial review of my road trip here on Bimmerforums: http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum/showthread.php?2086225-Just-bought-a-Touring!

It’s a work in progress but here are the highlights: 7,000 miles in a 2001 BMW 525i (yes it’s a manual!). I bought the car sight-unseen thanks to an exhaustive PPI from the Werk Shop in Chicago. Mom and Dad picked the car up from Chicago and drove it to Nashville. I left Columbus Georgia and drove the car back the next day, the wife was in the other car. Less than one week later we shipped the e30, sold the Nissan and Honda we were desperate to be rid of, and hit the road. We have so much stuff in the back we don’t have room for passengers, only us! We seriously took our time and saw friends and family in South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Missouri, Illinois, Arkansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Las Vegas, Arizona, and LA. Greatest road trip I’ve personally ever taken.

I also took a similar trip with my (then) girlfriend (now wife) from Florida to Washington state. That trip, though, was in a V6 mustang- GASP!

Now we live in Monterey, California!

Marco Siena
8 years ago

My greatest road trip is the Mille Miglia. Let’s be understood, I am not rich enough to own a car allowed to take part to the race. But I live in the town where the Mille Miglia starts and ends, Brescia, and most of the roads where the race is run are opened to the everyday traffic. Therefore from 2009 onwards I take my Alfa Duetto or my Lancia Fulvia Coupè and follow the race through Italy, to Rome and back, with some friends or alone. I’ ll do it again, next May and believe me, it’s quite special.

Luc Bonachera
Luc Bonachera
8 years ago

Interesting road trips, here!
I’ve done a couple myself. My very first was in 1994, from Strasbourg, France, to Portimao, south Portugal in a then-only-a-couple-of-years old 1991 Renault Clio 1.1. For those who don’t know what it is, it’s a small hatchback and that one had a 1.1, 49 BHP 4 cylinder engine mated to a 4-speed manual transmission. I was 19, had always been crazy about cars and loved this trip, which happened to be the first as many more followed:
In 2000, New Orlans – SF in a rentals (00 Oldsmobile Alero and 00 Chevy Malibu.
In 2000 too, Quito, Ecuador, to Chimborazo or Ibarra on the Panamericana in a 15 year old (or so) 1980s Toyota FJ (whose 6-cylinder engine noise was often mistaken by locals for the noise of a bus, having them run to the road thinking their ride had arrived).
In 2002, Virginia to NYC and back as well and Virginia to Miami and back with a 1990s Chrysler LeBaron coupe that needed its quart of oil everytime we stopped for gas.
In 2004, Virginia to California and back, first in a 96 Taurus Wagon whose tranny gave up the ghost in Sioux Falls, SD (we finished and headed back with a rental 04 Chevy Trailblazer).
In 2005, Strasbourg, France, to Vilnius, Lithuania, with a 1996 Ford Fiesta.
In 2006, Chicago, IL to Montreal, Qc and back with an 06 Ford Escape. The following week, Chicago, IL to Vancouver, British Columbia via the TransCanada highway, then San Francisco, CA, and back to Chicago in a 2006 Subaru Outback [url=”http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/98-trip-reports/8239-7500-miles-around-north-america.html”], for which you can see pictures here[/url].
In 2007: Strasbourg, France, to Stockholm, Sweden, in a 2004 Honda Jazz/Fit.
In 2008: Strasbourg, France, to Berlin, Germany, Prague, Czech Republic, back to Strasbourg, then Zadar, Croatia, and finally back home a couple of days before the birth of my daughter.
In 2009,[url=”http://www.vfl-fr.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=34432&hilit=v70+road+trip”]a couple of friends and I drove around the Baltic Sea with my 1998 Volvo V70 – sorry, only available in French[/url]. Strasbourg to Copenhague to Oslo to the Arctic Circle to Sweden to Helsinki to Tallinn and back home. The week after, I headed back to Northern Germany with my family.
In 2010, I drove a 2007 Mazda 3 from Chicago, IL to Saint Louis, MO, and went back at the wheel of a 1990s Mazda Miata on Route 66. Then, my brother-in-law and I purchased a 2004 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor which I drove with friends from Chicago to NYC, Montreal, Toronto and back to Chicago.
In 2011, I was very reasonnable… and only drove from France to Rome in the spring and in the summer to northern Poland and northern Germany (2004 Honda Jazz/Fit again).
In 2012, my most reasonnable year ever, I only drove my 07 Prius from Strasbourg to Paris, the Loire region, Aix-en-Provence, back to Strasbourg, then a few weeks after Rome and Naples, Italy, then Lake Constance and finally home.
2013 was a US year again: Chicago to Saint Louis to NYC to Niagara Falls to Detroit to Chicago with an early 00s Mazda Protégé5.

For 2014, I’m planning to go back to Norway and spend more time there.

Barry
Barry
8 years ago

I got drunk one night and wound up buying a 1979 Fiat X1/9 on Ebay. It was in Tacoma Washington. I live in Iowa. OOPS!
The next week Suzie and I flew to Sea-Tac where the (former) owner picked us up and took us to the car, dropped us off and drove away. We loaded our gear in the car and headed out. Drove it back to Iowa. Over 1600 miles in a unknown car over 4 days. Brave or stupid? Yes. Both at once. But it wound up being brave. The car didn’t miss a beat. What a good time!!! Let’s do it again.

Traveling Minimalist
Traveling Minimalist
8 years ago

Me and my girlfriend (and our dog Mr. Bernard) recently started a long-time trip to nowhere.

We lived in Czech Republic our whole childhood. Then we both started our freelance careers and 6 months ago we just decided to move to London. We sold everything we owned apart from computers, clothes and other small things we needed. And headed to London just like that! 🙂 Well, what can I say… London began to be pretty depressing with all its rain and fog all the time.

So we hit the road again! And for the last few weeks we are traveling around Europe. No finish line, no time line, just us, both with one suitcase in one car. So far we went from Czech Republic through Austria, Slovenia and now we are in Croatia. We move after one week in one place. So far we used only Airbnb to find the next place.

It’s just the beginning! We want to travel all the coasts of Europe, heading next to Bosnia, Italy, Monaco, France, Spain, UK again, BeNeLux, Sweden… we want to see it all! 🙂

You can check our twitter at https://twitter.com/TMinimalists

Stay safe!

Jos van Diermen
Jos van Diermen
8 years ago

My most epic roadtrip was 4 years ago with my 11 year old son in my 11 year old Alfa Spider 916. After a visit at the Nordschleife the clutch broke down. As the Spider wasn’t registered properly, the roadside-assistance wouldn’t bother to help us. But our dealer 600km further away would. I managed to jumpstart the Alfa in second gear and without clutch wrestle it in fifth gear. Without aid of satnav or knowlegde of the German language, my son navigated us with an old map through the Eiffel mountains, traffic jams near Koln, naming road numbers and cities passing by. The engine of the Alfa proved to be very elastic, picking up speed from 30 km/h in traffic jams to over 200 km/h on the limitless Autobahn. After 4 strenious hours, we arrived at the dealer on the last vapours of petrol and with sunblisters on our foreheads,, due to the fact that we drove top-down with a relentless sun over our heads.
It was truly a trip we will always remember, learning to deal with the flaws of an elderly Alfa and bonding between father and son by resolving problems. My boy became a little man that day and the Alfa? It’s still in the family, 16 years old and silently becoming a classic of its own era

Fredrik Assarsson
Fredrik Assarsson
8 years ago

Here’s a little story for you. Two summers ago. Two friends and a stupid idea. A mere 600kms or 7 hours from the northern polar circle lies a city called Östersund in Sweden. 24/7 daylight in the summer and 24/7 darkness in the winter (almost) means you have to stay productive. So me and my room mate kept us productive by having a little bit of nice wine and discussing ideas about a road trip.
Long story short: two friends in the northern part of sweden, one 1968 Volvo Amazon 2dr with a souped up 2.0L engine with weber carb and a [b]6500km[/b] long roadtrip from the northern part of sweden all the way to the champagne district in France to prove it could be done.
Since the exhaust was a straight-through type with only a silencer in the end the crusing speed with this 4spd was around 80-85 km/h so we only used B-roads for the entire trip.
The old Volvo took us through marvelous curvy roads through Germany’s country side all the way through the horrible “B-roads” that the french call roads but known elsewhere as construction sites, through bar’s and bets with bartenders as well as some interesting people along the way, made us meet the only swedish-talking german with a history of Volvo restorations behind him with spare time to help us, meeting the only other Amazon in Champagne, through the hariest, most physical (due to 35C degree heat and black vinyl seats and def. no AC!) and mentally demanding mountan roads I have ever been on all the way back to Sweden with around 80 bottles of champagne and wine, and a case of beer or two. This all went relatively smooth without deal-breakers along the way and with an average of 6.7L/100km or 35mpg – from a 1968 Volvo!
I won’t admit that it used 1L of oil for every tank of gas it used though… One person had to fill up the gas and one had to top up the oil. This acutally ensured that the oil in the engine allways was in tip-top shape 🙂

Did I mention this was done on studded tires with only the outer studs having been pulled out of the tires so that the gendarme in France wouldn’t shoot us or faint at the sight of the tires…?

It was a totally mad, very hazardous, no-GPS-only-paper-maps, exilerating and absolutely fantastic trip to have done at 25years of age that I’m looking at replicating in some way with my ’77 Alfetta GTV as soon s the restoration is complete.

For those of you blessed with the swedish language can read the whole story here: http://www.zatzy.com/allmaent/388797-j_vla-semester.html
The rest of you can look at the pictures and read most of it through google translate here: http://translate.google.se/translate?sl=sv&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=sv&ie=UTF-8&u=http\%3A\%2F\%2Fwww.zatzy.com\%2Fallmaent\%2F388797-j_vla-semester.html

Matt C
Matt C
8 years ago

I was 18 and just graduated High School. My childhood friend and I decided to drive to Florida from Baltimore Maryland. I had purchased a new 1988 1/2 Ford Escort LX and proceded to go to Orlando, then due west to Tampa, south to Fort Myers. From Ft. Myers, we crossed through alligator alley to Miami. Finally, leaving Miami to go to the keys. All the while, fishing any chance we could. While the car wasn’t the greatest(in hindsight) it averaged close to 40mpg and the experience of two childhood friends sharing good times before life and responsibilities beckon. I have been fortunate enough to travel quite alot here and internationally, but that first real road trip will always be a standout. As an aside, “[b]Oddomatik[/b]” represents the best example of a classic road trip. No real destinations or time crunch, just the travel

Fin Kerssies
Fin Kerssies
8 years ago

Here is my blog post of a trip to Croatia together with a friend.
Hope you enjoy reading it!
[url=”http://fin.me/blog/travel/croatia/”]fin.me/blog/travel/croatia[/url]

Emanuel Costa
Emanuel Costa
8 years ago

Pacific West Coast, 2012
Well, ther car might not be the greatest ride (Nissan Altima 2.5), but it sure was roomy.

After we got married in my hometown, Alcobaça, a small city in the center of Portugal, me and my wife went to San Francisco to have the trip of our lifes (until 2015, we hope). We drove from San Francisco to Yosemite, then Sacramento, then up the coast trough the Redwoods to Eureka and Crescent City. After that we took the I5 to Portland (remembering the infamous I5 killer), then again to the coast. We were the first europeans at a small motel in a town called Forest Grove. Staying in the unfergetable 101, we passed Cannon Beach, Astoria, Aberdeen, Kalaloch and then de Olympic Foresr to get to Port Angeles. We took the ferry to Victoria, drove to Ucluelet/Tofino and then back to Qualicum Beach and Nanaimo, where another ferry took us to Vancouver. After that we drove straight to Seattle one night, because all the hotels and motels where booked by canadians for that weekend!! From Seattle we got to Snoqualmie Falls and Mount Rainier.
We returned from Seattle-Tacoma after 17 days and 3.000 miles, remembering every moment, and regreting having to return…

Next year we hope to do the same from Philadelphia to Washington, up to Buffalo and Toronto, then Vermont, Boston and New York

John Austin
John Austin
8 years ago

Purchased an older Intermeccanica in San Diego and drove up the coast towards Canada. My best buddy for life was copilot. Californians are car nutz. They gathered around us at every stop. The car made many friends. The twisties the scenery the people all helped. YOLO bro!

Joseph Chimbolo
Joseph Chimbolo
8 years ago

Back in my mid 20’s, my Great Aunt gave me her 1966 Ford Anglia Super. A 36,000 mile original car. My friend, Ward Borden, and I flew from Connecticut to Daytona Beach to pick up the car. We kicked back a few days at the beach, did a little maintenance on the car and prepared to head north.

However, on the beach was a bar, Kokomo’s. The beer was cold and the waitresses weren’t. We hit the road after last call. It was not long before I knew there was a problem. The car kept losing power to the point I was heading north on I-95 in the breakdown lane at about 40mph at full throttle. About seven hours later, 40 miles from Savannah GA, she quit.

We got towed in the wrong direction to Darien, GA and were left at a 1950’s road side motel with trees growing out of what was the swimming pool. Three days trying to diagnose this little car came to nothing. The local mechanic at one point asked me to hold the coil wire to see if she had spark. When I declined, his assistant mechanic, whose complexion was a striking shade of grey, stepped right up and verified it had all 30,000 volts.

We thought we might turn this delay into an adventure. Looking for a place to water down, the local waitress directed us to a bar not to far down the road, but warned us ” you might not want to go, because there are a lot of shoot’ins there”. So looking for a convenience store we decided to start walking, just as we passed “Billy Bob’s Used Cars and Baptist Church”, there was a little station with a stocked cooler.

So heading back to the Bate’s Motel, and a vintage Pontiac Catalina pulled up next to me as I walked down the road and stopped. The old man looked out the passenger window and said “Son, you’re not from around here are you.” I said, “Sir, I am passing through, my car broke down”. He informed me “they don’t like people walking around here like that”. I asked, “like what?” And he pointed to the 12 pack of beer in the brown paper bag. He instructed me to get it to the hotel and out of site.

Needless to say, we headed to the hotel and locked the doors. My mom was heading home from Daytona too, so I had her pickup a tow-dolly, stop by, and get us home ASAP.

I learned a few things by the time I got home. I learned there really is such a things as a “country mile”. If a southerner tells you that a diner is down the road, about a mile, leave yourself some time, especially when walking. If your car breaks, check everything, rotors do go bad after all. Lastly, you cannot flat tow on the New Jersey Turnpike, give yourself an extra day or get a car trailer.

Daniel Bühl
Daniel Bühl
8 years ago

Last year my fiance and I drove through the alpes to Brescia with my 69 MGB GT, visiting the Mille Migila. It was a really nice trip. This year we will do several swiss and italian passes in june.

Toby Murray
Toby Murray
8 years ago

I’ve done a few road trips in my Porsche 944 but the most memorable was a 4,500 mile honeymoon drive through Europe from North of London. We took in the French Alps, Swiss Alps, Stelvio pass, Italy (Venice), Austria, Slovenia and ended up in Budapest. We didn’t have a plan or route just decided where we wanted to go over breakfast. For the entire trip the car was faultless only wanting for 1/2ltr of oil in Austria (now I’ve jinxed my next trip) and was so enjoyable on the mountain passes.

One great memory was an early morning drive out of the Duchy of Liechtenstein, as we descended the alpine hairpins the morning mist lifted and we caught glimpses of the ‘onion domed’ churches whose bells were calling the farmers to work from across the valley. The cold, fresh air, the sound of the car and that superb alpine road is something I’ll never forget.

If anyone is thinking of doing a road trip DO IT NOW SIR! (just don’t take a Satnav, you find the best things when lost)

Peter Nitecki
Peter Nitecki
8 years ago

My road trip was one of my best driving experience in my life – from UK to Stelvio Pass in Alps. Stayed there overnight and 6 am next morning I drove from Stelvio down to Croatia and Pag Island. I did not use ferry to get there – I drove all way down on best road you can imagine – E65 in Croatia fallowing coast line – 1300 miles one way. I spent week of my holiday in Croatia then I drove back to my home country – Poland – another 720 miles. Then from Poland back to UK – 980 miles. I drove around 3000 miles in 4 weeks in my awesome JDM DC5 Interga Type R 🙂
Next I would love to visit Norway and there great roads 🙂 with different cat now 😉

oddomatik
oddomatik
8 years ago

At 18 years of age, I found myself in the perfect life-situation for an adventure. I had $500, a moped, and few physical possessions. The bills were nill, so in January 2010 I rode 3500 miles from Asheville, NC to Northern California on a 50cc Puch Newport II. It took me 2 months (about 5 weeks of riding). Even though the max speed was about 25mph, the wind still chilled me to the bone with 5 layers on. I took a route as far southern as could be without dipping into Mexico. I rode through the swamps of Florida and enjoyed the sights and sounds of fanboats and solitude. Mobile Bay by ferry. Biloxi, Mississippi shortly after the hurricane. A hostel in New Orleans provided a welcomed shower and a night off the streets. I resealed the motor on the steps of the Super Dome after it started backfiring from an air leak. Texas was LONG and COLD. I waited out storms in abandoned farm houses and just West of Pecos found myself lost for 2 days.
No roads, no power lines, no houses or signs of life. Just cactus and dry stream beds. I eventually found a fence and followed it to a maintenance road, to a ranch road, to a paved road and ran out of gas 10 feet onto the pavement next to a sign reading “Van Horn 38 miles”. I walked, and eventually came across a nice rancher on horseback who brought me a gallon of gas.
El Paso to Phoenix, on through the most solitary and beautiful roads to 29 Palms. Over the grade to Long Beach, then up the Central Valley of California, criss-crossing the farm roads between 99 and 5 for a few days. Over Altamont Pass road between thousands of modern windmills to my final destination.
It was demanding both physically and mentally, but I wouldn’t trade the experience for anything.

oddomatik
oddomatik
8 years ago
Reply to  oddomatik

Attachment didn’t go through? Link, just in case:

[url=”http://brianandr.us/images/mop2.jpg”]http://brianandr.us/images/mop2.jpg
[/url]

[/list]

Steve Fitz
Steve Fitz
8 years ago

2012 – Drove and cycled the roads of Colorado with my wife and some good friends in a small two car caravan overloaded with gear and bikes. Great memories. Going to do it again this year I hope.

Steve Fitz
Steve Fitz
8 years ago
Reply to  Steve Fitz

wrote it up in two parts on my blog:
http://monovich.com/blackpearl/?p=166

Steve Fitz
Steve Fitz
8 years ago
Reply to  Steve Fitz

wrote it up in two parts on my blog:
http://monovich.com/blackpearl/?p=166

Matthew Lange
Matthew Lange
8 years ago

I’ve done plenty of road trips in my time but the one that stands out was to the Ferrari 50th anniversary in 1997. The previous year my Dad had acquired a Ferrari 250SWB (Chassis 3605GT for those that keep track of these things). The invite to bring the car to the 50th anniversary as one of 200 special Ferraris was received shortly after Dad brought the car, the trouble was it needed a complete restoration and the event was only nine months away..

The body was handled by Ferrari specialist Moto Technique while Dad’s Mechanic Vince handled the mechanical work. Inevitably timing was very tight and the car was only finished the night before Dad was due to leave. The plan was to drive the car to Rome, but with only the opportunity for one short 50 mile test drive there was concern that the then 34 year old car would be make it without any problems. Dad set off on the 1000 mile trip to Rome in the Ferrari with Vince following in the Grand Cherokee jeep that Dad used as a daily driver at the time. The 4X4’s boot was stocked full of all the spares that they could lay their hands on. Work commitments meant that I had to fly out to Rome on a miserable British Airways 737, two days later.

The event itself was an interesting affair the first day the cars were displayed at the Olympic Stadium, followed by a parade through Rome on the Sunday. The highlight of the day for me was standing in the vehicle assembly area waiting for our group to parade the closed road section, when a certain Michael Schumacher (get well soon Michael) returned from his run in his F1 car, I was less than two feet away when he passed by me blipping the throttle on the 3.0 V10 F1 engine. I doubt I will get that close to an F1 one car in motion, much less one driven by the great man himself, again.

The following day the collection of cars drove the section of the Mille Miglia route from Rome to the Ferrari factory in Maranello, passing through Florence and Siena. Dad elected to take a break from driving and left Vince with me as passenger to drive the SWB. It was a fun day and the mountain passes gave ample opportunity for the SWB to show off its legendary handling balance. Despite the crude leaf spring rear suspension the SWB was probably the best handling Ferrari Dad has owned (well best handling at legal road speeds anyway), and unlike the Daytona is much more comfortable at some extreme slip angles. At one point the cars in our batch were separated from the police escort and naturally the pace stepped up and maybe a little red mist descended on a few drivers as we charged through the mountains.

Two problems did occur, firstly the brakes in the original configuration wilted in the spring time Italian heat. Coming downhill from one of the many mountain passes an Italian Mercedes C Class driver will forever have the memory of a 250SWB coming sideways round a corner as the faded brakes meant we entered the turn a little too hot. Later back in England Vince modified the brakes by moving the calipers from the front, where they were originally mounted, to the back of the disc (in the early sixties disc brakes were still in their infancy).
The second issue was a problem from the slightly rushed restoration, The heat shield on the passenger side of the car was missing so the passenger (my) footwell was getting very warm by the end of the day and the soles of my shoes were starting to go soft.

Other than these issues the car ran all day without any problems (indeed it ran faultlessly on the whole trip). After a couple of days on display at Maranello we drove the car back to England, the sound of the 3.0 V12 echoing through the Mont Blanc tunnel being another highlight. I’ve had many adventures in my own Daytona but as great as they were none have yet to top that passenger ride to Rome

Antony Ingram
Antony Ingram
8 years ago

Unfortunately I’ve never embarked upon a bona fide road trip in a classic vehicle, unless you count the 200 miles I did in my old Beetle after picking it up.

But I’ve certainly done a fair few amazing road trips. Top of the list was last September, on my second east-to-west trip across the U.S. Half the journey was just in a rental Hyundai, but the second half, including a visit to Yosemite and camping in California, was in a 1980s/early 90s Chevy Astro. Real hunk of junk but painted in psychedelic colours and had real character. Certainly one of the best things I’ve ever done and the Astro was comfortably the best-worst vehicle I’ve rented!

A banger rally jaunt from the north of England to the south of Spain in an old diesel Citroen ZX was also one to remember. Some of Spain’s scenery is quite spectacular, and I’ll never forget the return journey, where three of us switched driving duties over a 21-hour non-stop trip from Puerto Banus in Spain to Poitiers in France. I need to travel more of Europe one day, and certainly more of the U.S.

Antony Ingram
Antony Ingram
8 years ago
Reply to  Antony Ingram

The road trip van in question. Not sure it can count as “Drive Tastefully” given the colour scheme, but the will is there!

Sid Widmer
Sid Widmer
8 years ago

Z4 M Coupe. Lubbok TX to Bend OR. 1900 MIles. Two days. Average speed 99.8MPH. Glorious.

Benjamin Shahrabani
Benjamin Shahrabani
8 years ago

1800 miles in my recently purchased 1967 911S, from Kansas to Los Angeles in just about 24 hours. I saw parts of America I had never seen before.

Adam Holter
Adam Holter
8 years ago

My best road trip went down this past summer. 4400 miles (Jefferson, MD, to DuBoise, WY and back) in 9 days, including 2 days of visiting DuBois. So, 7 days on the road in my ’68 Dart…that was the trip of a lifetime. Sure, I broke down in North Dakota, and sure, I had to continue west in a rented Toyota pickup, but I won’t soon forget the ride.

http://365daysofdart.blogspot.com/2013/07/wob-beginning.html?q=WoB

Jake Williams
Jake Williams
8 years ago

The best road trip I ever took was also the most tragic… I guess?

My family and I took a voyage to The Outer Banks from Northeast Ohio. Other than the boring 8 hour drive through the scenic roads of Pennsylvania, the highlight of our trip was in the D.C. circle. Most people who’ve been around the circle know it’s almost always a traffic jam. So, whilst stuck in said traffic jam, we took the slow lane and waded our way through… up until the rear end of the car shot up and forwards about 3 feet. Me, being the kid I am, knew better than to wear a seatbelt, so I went flying into the front seat. When we settled down and everyone made everyone was ok, a man came around to the window and asked if we were ok. The middle eastern man had very broken English, but we were ok. We all got out of the old Explorer and looked at the damage. We made out pretty alright, but the guy and his SEVEN BUDDIES in their Sentra somehow survived with the front end so crumpled that the engine was in the dashboard.

The upshot is, with an Explorer that wasn’t really going to be fixed, 8 year old me got to drive all over the dunes of S.C. Thus, I had the best beach vacation any 8 year old could muster.