Journal: These Are Your Favorite Land Barges

These Are Your Favorite Land Barges

Petrolicious Productions By Petrolicious Productions
June 5, 2015
8 comments

We were recently inspired by the floaty, comfortable nature of large sedans to consider our favorites, and as it turns out, there’s something for everyone. Classic sedans are often undervalued compared to their sportier stablemates, and as a result, many of these are great candidates for a classic car—if you don’t mind owning something that’s a bit more focused on cruising.

The car: Virgil Exner-designed Chrysler Imperials, suggested by Adam Kerr

“For me, it absolutely has to be the last of the Exner-designed Imperials, ’61-’63. 1961 is the most true to the designer’s vision—a Jet Age, mid-century tour de force. Its heavy chrome and dramatic fins were already going out of style when it rolled off the assembly line, but half a century later it’s clear there will never be another design like it. Plus, the big-block Mopar engine, Torqueflight auto, and full perimeter frame make it both powerful and nearly indestructible.”

The car: 1976 Buick Estate Wagon, mentioned by T Martin Higgins

This comment was, well, a bit sad to read! T Martin Higgins says, “I’ve long been a fan of the land barge. Choosing one favorite is like choosing a favorite child—but if I had to choose one among the list I’ve personally owned, it would have to be the 1976 Buick Estate Wagon in hunter green with woody sides and tan corduroy 9-passenger interior and the clamshell rear door. It was at once luxurious, cavernous, great looking and unexpectedly swift and fun to drive. I still miss it.”

The car: 1963 Lincoln Continental, suggested by Sid Widmer

With power to spare and suicide doors, this mid-century marvel comes from a time when Lincoln still supplied its cars to the President of the United States—need we say more? Frequently used in movies, favored by celebrities and collectors alike, the car could be had in sedan, 2-door sedan, or convertible body styles, with our favorite being the sedan.

The car: Maserati Quattroporte III, mentioned by Matthew Lange

“I would go with the the later Quattroporte III especially in final Royale trim (more luxury and more power). Clearly meant to be a rival to the Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, Mercedes 450SEL 6.9 and the crazy Aston Martin Lagonda, I love the understated but at the same time imposing Giugiaro lines, but also for the fact that it was weirdly available with a manual gearbox. Did Maserati think that once the chauffeur had dropped the captain of industry / head of organised crime family / dictator of a small country (delete as applicable) owner off for dinner the chauffeur, could go off and have some fun with the combination of manual gearbox and D.O.H.C. Maserati V8?”

The car: Citroën XM, mentioned by Antony Ingram

Antony Ingram reminded us of the Jensen One by Max René, a rebodied Citroën XM that looked even more extreme than the standard model—and it’s the video we’ve embedded above. We christen it the “space barge”. Ingram says: “As a choice from left-field, any big Citroen. A CX would do, though I’ve always liked the wedgy look of the XM. Those came with a V6 too, and I’d say that six cylinders are a bare minimum when it comes to choosing a barge.”

The car: Chrysler 300D, suggested by Jordan Schooley

Sometimes, speed matters, like Jordan Schooley says: “Last of the famous letter series to use the Hemi engine. Topped 156 mph at Bonneville—in 1958. Waftability and serious performance, [an] amazing combination.”

The car: Bugatti EB112, suggested by Guitar Slinger

We know all about the EB112, a car that never made it into production. For the ultimate in four-door cruising, we’ll let Guitar Slinger give you the pertinent details:

“The one that never was. Should of been. And came within a hare’s breath of happening—the brutally elegant Giorgetto Giugiaro-designed Bugatti EB112 . All the mechanicals of the EB110 in glorious sedan form. To illustrate how close the car did come to going into production, as I type this I’m holding a copy of the official Giugiaro sales brochure they gave out in order to gauge interest and generate future sales. From all that was said to the prospective buyers, the car was within one evolution of being production ready.”

Image Sources: blogspot.com, goodoldvalves.tumblr.com, oldcarbrochures.org, imperialclub.compinimg.com

 

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Jack Gabus
Jack Gabus

The Lincoln Convertible was the coolest Sofa on wheels. Parents had one in metallic turquoise green with matching leather interior. Quite the statement indeed.

Jens VonBulow
Jens VonBulow

I really like Petrolicious; the stories, the photography, the interaction of favorites voting. There is some very clever writing as well, expecially by the Slinger.

Frank Anigbo
Frank Anigbo

Dubious grammar, yes, but GS does add invaluable interest to this site with his always entertaining commentary and knowledgeable insight. For that alone we should be glad and leave the man alone.

Unlike TJ and MJ, he has not insulted anyone.

Stephan Wikinson
Stephan Wikinson

Poor Gunslinger. He submits some pretentious silliness–“I read Ivanhoe when I was six”–but doesn’t know how to spell T. S. Eliot’s name and starts his rant by typing “Either in todays writing is acceptable…” while not understanding that being unaware that his missing apostrophe isn’t. Those of us who write for a living have always had to put up with the “It’s a living language, so what I write today will be correct tomorrow” types, but the ubiquity of keyboards sure has made it worse.

Jens VonBulow
Jens VonBulow

No GS, there is no “should of been”. What you’re thinking of is “should’ve been”.

Bdpd
Bdpd

Gunslinger- I agree with your points but question your grammar. ‘Should of been’ is not ‘should have been’ which is what it should have been. A ‘hare’s breath’ is actually a ‘hair’s breadth’ which is the tiny measurement you’re looking for. Read more and keep writing!

Guitar Slinger
Guitar Slinger

On the first criticism I’m afraid you’re being a bit overly pedantic as well as just a little dated . Either in todays writing is acceptable [ fortunately or unfortunately , take your pick ] On the second I realized my mistake the minute I posted it , but since the Editing Function is not available to me I was unable to correct it after the fact . As far as reading more though ? Try ” Ivanhoe ” at age 6 , all of Hesse’s books by 18 , toss in a healthy dose of most everything from Kafka… Read more »

Guitar Slinger
Guitar Slinger

PPSS ; Upon careful reflection you’ve got to admit ‘ Hare’s breath ‘ is kind of a cute albeit incorrect alternative for ‘ hairs breadth ‘ .