Featured: This Mercedes 280SE Lowrider Blends Period-Correct Options With Modern Modification

This Mercedes 280SE Lowrider Blends Period-Correct Options With Modern Modification

By Jimmy Uria
October 24, 2017
24 comments

Photography by Shane Allen

My interest in cars goes back much further, but when I got my driver’s license I was mainly interested in Japanese imports, and the first car I started modifying myself wore the “H” of Honda. The Mercedes you see here may not seem like a natural progression from that point, but in many ways my experience with imports translated seamlessly into classics. I’ve never considered myself a devotee of any particular make or model, and soon after that first Honda of mine I began looking for a car to satisfy my want of something with some deeper history behind it.

The first classic car I owned was a 1964 Cadillac, and since that car my garage has been home to plenty of stuff from both Japan and the broader past. I don’t discriminate,  I simply like what I like, and one car I’d always had an urge to own and build to my taste was an older Mercedes sedan. I wanted to fit a modern air suspension to the car, sort of like what the 300SELs came with from the factory, but far less maintenance intensive and wallet gouging.   

I began my search for the right car back in 2009, and after a few crusty ones and some exorbitant asking prices, I found a W108 a little less than a year later. It was already restored, and I enjoyed daily driving that car for a few months before the fuel pump went at a light. I didn’t get around to replacing it, so I set it aside until I was ready. The experience did nothing to turn me off of the chassis though, and since that first Merc I’ve been a big proponent of the W108 and W109. This led to the car pictured. I’ve owned it for almost five years now, and coincidentally it is the same model year as the first that I bought, a 1972, only this is a right-hand drive model. Being into Hondas, I’d seen more than my fair share of left-to-right-hand drive conversions, but this car had never been cut into. It’s rare to find one set up from the factory like this at all, but more so when it’s already been brought to the US, so I called on the car and tried to not sound too excited.

I learned that this ’72 280SE 3.5 had been imported from Jamaica of all places, and its US owner acquired it sometime in the 1980s. Sometime along the way, he’d converted it to US-spec by adding the relevant pieces like headlights, taillights, side markers, gauge cluster, etc. Since I’d been into the W108s for a few years at this point, I’d amassed a small horde of OEM optional parts and accessories that I was eager to install on the right car. With this one being in decent shape and in such a rare configuration to see Stateside, I took a look at the car and not long afterwards, brought it home with me.

When I first acquired it, everything besides the lighting and consumables was original, but it was always going to be more of a project car that needed some restoring, so I had no qualms about what I planned to do with it in the future. Within the first few weeks of ownership I had gotten it running correctly, and the first thing I bought was a set of one-inch whitewalls. It’d come to me with solid black tires that were slightly oversized from stock diameter—common for those seeking a bit more comfort from the already stately ride—though I preferred the period-correct look and originality in terms of sidewall sizing. I suppose they weren’t the first items I’d purchased for it though, as back when my other one was running I’d asked a friend in the Netherlands who’d helped me source rare parts for my Hondas if he could find a set of RHD-spec European headlights with integrated fogs, some French-spec taillights, and a rear fog light. He found the heads and tails in less than a month, and soon after I sourced the fog light—I had my “kit” so to speak.

Before installing the lighting that I’d tucked away years ago, I wanted to get the car on modern air suspension, and it’s made the car exactly as I’d envisioned. It can do everything now; at driving height it’s compliant but planted, it easily dodges potholes and absorbs the inevitable ones, and you’d be none the wiser thinking it wasn’t all OEM. With a few button pushes, the same car can also put its frame rails on the pavement and fit in amongst any lowrider crowd. If you’ve seen what happens to the original Mercedes adjustable suspension that the top models were fitted with when the system is neglected, you might mistake mine for having succumbed to a similar fate, but then I simply raise it back up and drive wherever I need to without worry. It’s not for the strict purists, but I like to think of it as a modern version of the original option that’s much easier to work with and maintain, plus I love the way the long, straight shape of the body looks when it’s lowered.

After getting the suspension sorted, it then came time for the host of optional parts and period-correct accessories that I’d been collecting. I started with fitting my lighting kit that I’d saved for so long, and soon after came another set of whitewalls, only this time with the thicker stripes I’d wanted from the start. I drove it like this for a few years until I decided it was time to finally repaint and restore it. So, I stripped it down in my garage, drove it to the bodyshop, and had them spray it in the same OEM Silver Grey. While that was happening, I also had all the brightwork re-polished and all the chrome pieces redone as well. This led to me also buying the whole host of OEM rubber bits, clips, hinges—all the little ancillary pieces that always surprise you in their abundance when you start really picking cars apart. 

After the paint was finished, I took the car back and began fitting all this to it as I reassembled everything. I’d also collected a few more OEM optional parts at this point that I’d been trying to locate since my first Merc back in 2010, and most of these pieces took years of patience and searching to find. The interior for example has a bunch of optional extras like the long armrests, center seat adapter, ivory -colored steering wheel, rear speakers, C-pillar reading lights, a first-aid kit, and a European-spec searchlight.

On the exterior, I’ve fitted among other pieces a grille guard, window visors, the gas door pull lever, a period-correct thermometer, and a collection of OEM decals that I’ve tracked down over the years. I also had the front end wrapped in clear paint protection film to avoid getting rock chips on the new (at the time) paint job—I drive this car a lot, so it was definitely needed. And now, having owned it for almost half a decade, I can say I’m proud to have accomplished the look I’d be chasing for so many years, and I’ll be getting around to fixing my first one too. As it’s already been restored to OEM specification, I plan to keep only original parts on that car, so if you’re offended by this one know that my other W108 will be purist-approved!

Join the Conversation
Related
0 0 votes
Article Rating
24 Comments
newest
oldest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
RK - No Relation
RK - No Relation
2 years ago

Haters gonna hate, Purists gonna pure, but doing a car like this is better than leaving it to rot somewhere. It’s kind of a resto-mod and this is how cars get saved. Plus its feckin’ cool man!

Lars Birkemose
Lars Birkemose
3 years ago

It more like blends Period-Correct Options, with just bad taste.

Giancarlo Fruzzetti
Giancarlo Fruzzetti
3 years ago

Yuck. Rubbish.

H Bosch
H Bosch
3 years ago

When this car is on its normal stance, I only take issue with the chrome bar. It interrupts the clean lines and beauty of the one piece headlamps. Otherwise stare inducing. Sorry to ask but wtf is that on the windshield ?

Hardeep Singh
Hardeep Singh
3 years ago

I’m pretty sure I see this car driving in my neighborhood, in an LA residential area. Everytime I see this thing leaving the community I just stare. Such a beautifully done ride, and looks great sitting low. I’m going to have to stop this guy and let him know I read the article. It looks better in person than in these pics.

ibast
ibast
3 years ago

These things are not super collectable (but are getting rarer) so some modification is not the end of the world for these thing. The problem with bagging these things is the rear suspension. It’s a swing axle design. The worst independent suspension, but with the w108 Benz has sorted it really well and made it pretty good. Lowering it excessively, without correcting the diff height, undoes all of Mercedes’ good work and would turn it into a pig to drive. If you are going to change the height of these things, you need to take the time to set it up properly. With bagging you are varying the geometry every time you adjust the height and that is much worse on these cars than modern multi-link cars.

Cristian Alexander
Cristian Alexander
4 years ago

Unless someone else want to help pay for anything, they should STFU and just let the owner do their thing.

ibast
ibast
3 years ago

So people can comment positively, but not negatively? The logic of that doesn’t even make sense in real life, let alone the internet.

Robert Shisler
Robert Shisler
4 years ago

IMO, purists are a plague on automotive mankind. Modifry away, I say. Let the purists cry their trespassing tears! 🙂

p.s. nice merckie 🙂

Shaun McElvaine
Shaun McElvaine
4 years ago

It’s obviously going to cause divided opinions – but I think that this car is beautiful.

Patrick Andrews
Patrick Andrews
4 years ago

I was thinking this was a serious error, in terms of design, but given the pathetic behaviour of some who don’t like it, I’m now starting to appreciate the whole lowrider concept 😉

JB21
JB21
4 years ago

Man, this is totally wrong, and I’m loving it!! This is so cool.

MMK
MMK
4 years ago

Yes low rider classic Mercedes may be a travesty for a lot of purists (myself including). BUT as someone who is in a leadership position Mercedes-Benz Club, I look at it in a different and positive way; younger people embracing the brand and it’s classics. Jimmy Uria you have done an amazing job and have saved a beautiful Mercedes from the crusher. I am restoring a W111 and know how much effort and money it takes to restore these cars. Your car is beautiful, please keep up the good work, would love to see your “purists approved 108” when it is done.

GuitarSlinger
GuitarSlinger
4 years ago

Eeesh .. How to take a perfectly good classic Mercedes and turn it into a lowrider travesty with little or no effort removing all aspects of drivability in the process . Disgusting and tasteless sums this up nicely … belonging on the pages of Stancworks … not Petrolicious

Alexandre Goncalves
Alexandre Goncalves
4 years ago
Reply to  GuitarSlinger

You really need to make yourself heard, don’t you?! I’m sure , visiting Petrolicious site must be the highlight of your week – only that way could I explain such need and negative attitude towards everything that’s not up to your personal tastes…

I hope that when I get old, I’ll be WAY more tolerant to others achievements…

Offending others, it’s not really the way you should spend the rest of your days…. But, what do I know, according to you, i’m just a snowflake, right? 😉

De Dion
De Dion
4 years ago
Reply to  GuitarSlinger

Excuse me, but how does the fitting of an air suspension remove all aspects of drivability? Or was this again just a pointless whisky fumed rant of a lonely miserable baby boomer.

Robert Shisler
Robert Shisler
4 years ago
Reply to  GuitarSlinger

Cry, cry, CRY into the night, lonely warrior. It amuses and relaxes me…. ;-p

Brandon Terretti
Brandon Terretti
4 years ago
Reply to  GuitarSlinger

You must have nothing productive to do with your time. You comment on damn near every story with some negative comment. Maybe it is the fact you’re older and just do not care for anything beyond the standard restoration or preservation style vehicle. Possibly you are a younger guy with a severe case of early onset grumpiness. Either way I am sure, and I do not think I am alone on this, that you have never heard or practiced the saying, “if you don’t have something nice to say, keep it to yourself”. Not sure why you would spend so much time on a website where you seriously find every story unappealing to your vehicle taste and or automotive views.
As for this specific story, like it or not you’re going to see more of this as the younger generations start to find ways to make vintage vehicles more their taste or ways to set their chassis apart from a field of showroom stock restorations. This Merc is a period correct restoration with the only thing being different is the install of a set of air struts and air management. You need to give credit to the owner for actually doing the research to find period correct options to further set the car apart from other faithful restorations. Not sure if you know but aftermarket air suspension has come a long way just in the last five years or so. I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised to find that the modern aftermarket air struts are significantly superior to the OEM replacement air suspension that these chassis came equipped with making the car that much more reliable and fun to drive.
I have restored quite a few cars of which a couple have even taken first place at Pebble Beach Concour. I am very aware of the importance of a faithful restoration or preservation, but at the same realize that the collector car market is in for some significant changes in the near future. Many of the automotive collectors are aging and the next generation is either not interested in taking over the collection or taking it upon themselves to start a collection of vintage cars. I feel the brass era cars and pre-war cars are going to take a big hit as the new generation doesn’t find these type cars as appealing as a new supercar or some other more modern high-end vehicle. If any of the vintage vehicles are going to survive the generational swapping of ownership you’re going to have to accept the sight of more and more of these type “restorations” as seen with this article.
I could continue but I feel it is probably pointless as you will continue to find anything possible to comment negatively on with future articles anyway. I would like to thank Petrolicious for all the hard work they put forth in providing new and interesting articles accompanied with stunning photos.

Alexandre Goncalves
Alexandre Goncalves
4 years ago

Beautiful Mercedes! Thanks for sharing!

GuitarSlinger
GuitarSlinger
4 years ago

Dumb

Chris Henniker
Chris Henniker
4 years ago

Low and Firme, as it should be.

GuitarSlinger
GuitarSlinger
4 years ago
Reply to  Chris Henniker

Dumber

JProt
JProt
4 years ago

A cool car and a great inspirational story. Thanks for sharing it with us.

GuitarSlinger
GuitarSlinger
4 years ago
Reply to  JProt

… and dumberer