Featured: Buy a Classic–Help a College

Buy a Classic–Help a College

By Clayton Seams
June 3, 2013
6 comments

Far too many car collections are kept from the light of day. Undoubtedly there are many warehouses around the world that house incredible collections of cars that sadly will rarely be shared with the public. Alberta rancher, J. C. “Jack” Anderson wanted to share his cars in a way that could help others so he donated some of his cars to Olds College in Alberta; one hundred and six cars, to be exact.

The scale and breadth of the collection takes a while to sink in. From svelte Jaguars to lumbering Cadillacs, the collection covers a wide range of automotive tastes. There is one Japanese car and only few German cars but the collection is largely made up of British and American classics.

The collection features many classic Jaguars, but a standout was definitely the achingly beautiful British racing green 1956 XK-140.

The Jag was in great condition and looked lovely on painted (not chromed!) wire wheels. No doubt this one will find a home at the auction this June.

Perhaps the most exciting thing about this auction is that all these cars will have new homes afterwards. That’s because every single one of the 106 cars will be auctioned off with no reserve between June 21 and 23. (Click here for full list of cars going up for auction. Click here for more information on the collection.)

Though many of the cars in the collection were in excellent condition, others needed a fair bit of work before they could be sold. Every car being sold must be able to start, run and stop, hence the SRS tags on a few of the cars. Some cars have proven more difficult to resuscitate than others, and one Jaguar E-Type has been particularly stubborn.

Due to the size of the collection and the level of work needed to prime these cars for sale, the volunteer workforce is impressive in their dedication and their numbers. The disused Ford dealership that currently houses the collection is alive with activity every Saturday and has been for nearly a year to make this auction a reality.

One particular 1966 Mustang looked ready to cruise with a healthy 289 V8 and GM-esque aqua-blue paint. Far too often these early Mustangs are spoilered and scooped into GT350 “clones” so it’s nice to see one of these remain stock down to the hubcaps.

It would be an arduous endeavor to try and profile each interesting car in the collection, but I hope I have at least shed light on the existence of the collection and the upcoming auction. Let us know in the comments which car you would most like to take home from the collection!

Photography by Clayton Seams

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Tom90
Tom90
1 year ago

really interesting article, i’m glad to read it. Especially i like this part: “The scale and breadth of the collection takes a while to sink in. From svelte Jaguars to lumbering Cadillacs, the collection covers a wide range of automotive tastes. There is one Japanese car and only few German cars but the collection is largely made up of British and American classics.” It would be great if you share this information at https://pro-papers.com/research-proposal-writing. I’ll be thanksful.

Kristina Barkley
Kristina Barkley
2 years ago
Ryan Sarkar
Ryan Sarkar
8 years ago

I’ve been staring at the cars for a number of the past few days. I still think it’s incredible to find such wonderful car collections in small town Alberta. I particularly have soft spot for the ’73 Datsun.

Andre C  Hulstaert
Andre C Hulstaert
8 years ago

Hello:
For me, being a “Jaguarista” (I know an Italian term for a British car. . . but it sounds better). For me it is the MK II. I had three of them in succession and used them as daily drivers. One of them was even a 1959 pre-prodction as the model came out only in 1960. They were lovely cars and I enjoyed them a lot. They started the trend of sports sedan taken up later, and with great success by BMW.
The dash was rich and full with a row of tumbler switches, not unlike the switches on in my Maserati Ghibly. They were a joy to drive ad had an electric overdrive which was finicky if there was the slightest impurity in the gearbox oil. The engine was a typical long stroke as most British were. Thus it was not so lively but smooth as butter. When taken some time to synchronize the two SU carburetors, I managed an idle of only 300 rpm !! Aside from the enormous torque of the V12 there was no noticeable difference in the smoothness. Another thing of the period was the climate control, or rather lack thereof. The heater was OK, but it was next to impossible to cool the interior on a sunny day. Also those chrome spoke wheels look fantastic but are quite a chore to clean.
I attach here some pictures and a link to some more on my site http://www.hulstaertphoto.us/jaguar-mk-ii/
Enjoy !
Andre

Matthew Lange
Matthew Lange
8 years ago

The Jaguar Mk2 3.8 Manual with 25,000 miles on it sounds interesting!

rem83
rem83
8 years ago

I’m a a bit curious about the 2000 XKR coupe listed as a “5 spd manual” – I’ve heard the conversion has been done, might be interesting if it’s not a listing error.