Featured: Goodwood Revival is Much More Than Just Classic Cars

Goodwood Revival is Much More Than Just Classic Cars

By Amy Shore
September 23, 2014
17 comments

Photography by Amy Shore for Petrolicious

Power walking through the quickly-filling track of the Goodwood motor circuit, clad in my 1950s day dress, frilly ankle socks, bright red lipstick and pearl necklace, the only thing that looked out of place was the Nikon D600 camera swinging around my neck–not quite fitting the period style I was going for. However, I wasn’t going to let that little inaccuracy affect my fun as for the first time ever, I was one of Goodwood’s official photographers for their 16th annual Goodwood Revival where spectators and drivers alike get to turn back time for a glorious three days.

Despite it only being 7:30am, I was already late. As I headed towards the press center, the air was embroidered with a variety of smells from cooking bacon-breakfast rolls wafting from one of the many food vans to exhaust fumes from the Jaguar D-Types with mechanics swarming about. Hairspray was visibly escaping from the already heaving hairdressers as women (dressed far more glamorously than myself) sat having their hair twisted into victory rolls topped with a fascinator. I hadn’t even seen any racing yet and I was already seriously excited about the weekend ahead of me.

The Goodwood Revival launched its first event on 18 September 1998, precisely fifty years to the day since the Goodwood circuit first opened. The Earl of March re-enacted the opening of the track at its very first Revival meeting in the same Bristol 400 that his grandfather had used 50 years previously. The track had been untouched by the modern world and had previously been restored to mirror its image from the ’50s to every detail. Today, the Goodwood Revival now attracts over 100,000 visitors each year and still continues to hold its quixotic values with the majority of spectators in period clothing as they enjoy the exceptional classic racing.

The three day event provides full days of racing for enthusiasts who eagerly set up their folding chairs at the track fence with their packed lunch and tea flasks. Disappointingly, most of these folk aren’t dressed in period clothing but are there with eyes like excited children in a giant sweet shop for their love of the superb classic racing. You’ll probably find the flip side of the crowd in the Veuve Clicquot tent on the Richmond Lawn as they’re judged for the daily Best Dressed competition. Strutting their stuff, the best dressed judged award winners for both the ladies and the gentlemen depending not only on their overall look, but also the accuracy and authenticity of their outfits, whether they’re elegantly dressed women draped in mink fur or stylish men clothed in a period pilot’s uniform.

If you’re struggling for an outfit, you can always head over to The Highstreet where you’ll find rows and rows of shops and stalls selling everything vintage or car related that you can imagine; artwork, badges, hats, fur coats, toys, even juke-boxes and free-standing safes. Here, you can also find cafes and pubs dotted around for a light refreshment or even the fully, authentically stocked Tesco supermarket to grab some lunch.

For even more food and entertainment options, you can head Over The Road where you’ll find fairground rides, a Helta Skelta, carousel rides, singers, waffle vans, and if you have an extra penny or two, the jaw dropping Bonhams auction building.

This year’s event also had a sight that had not been seen for over 60 years–two Lancaster aeroplanes flying in formation with one another whilst being accompanied by Spitfires and Hurricanes. The crowd’s eyes were torn from the racing, their tea, and their entertainment to simply gaze up at these magnificent flying machines. The press center was also conveniently placed alongside the airstrip which was a fantastic spot to admire the aircraft however, conversation did have to temporarily cease as the numerous aircraft set off and landed.

Finally, we come to the cars and the racing. Cars worth millions of pounds are casually parked in their modest paddocks alongside one another. No barriers, no distance requirements and if you want to know more about the car, there is nearly always one of its mechanics around. When it comes to the racing, there’s not much more I can say other than if you want to experience breathtaking, tire-squealing, rubber-burning, heart-stirring, nose-to-tail, wheel-to-wheel racing where the drivers race more dangerously and more daringly than you’ve ever seen in your life, get yourself tickets for the 2015 Goodwood Revival.

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Ed
Ed

The “fog effect” is just the image falling out of focus and is caused by the shallow depth of field you get when shooting on a longer lens or with a fast lens with large aperture. Strange to see such negative responses to it as it’s been used creatively by photographers since day one. And used to great effect here.

Great photos that have a lot of character and give a real sense of the period fun of the festival!

Sylvia

Wonderful photos!

Pierro
Pierro

I thought my knowledge about classic racing cars was ok, until I saw this last picture… Can anyone tell me what the hell is that masterpiece of aluminum !? For some reasons it makes me think of a Lola but I know it’s not a Lola, it doesn’t come any close to the lines of a T70 or anything like it… At the same time, those gills behind the rear wheels are very “ferrarish”, like a 250gto, but the front is too “porschy” to be a Ferrari though… I don’t know, I’m stuck. Thank you guys

Paul Thompson
Paul Thompson

It’s an ISO Bizzarini A3C in all it’s riveted naked aluminum glory. It is gorgeous!

Designed by Giotto Bizzarrini who worked on the 250 GTO when he was at Ferrari.

More [url=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/thompsph/sets/72157634952755099/”]here[/url]

Egbert Prenger
Egbert Prenger

Pierro,
It’s a ISO Bizzarrini A3C. Giotto Bizzarrini was a former Ferrari engineer whom is credited with developing the Ferrari 250 GTO and 250 SWB amongst others. After a row with Ferrari he moved to ISO and later founded Bizzarrini.

Pierro
Pierro

ISO ! Of course ! Why didn’t I think about it ? It actually looks a bit like a Grifo as well now I look at it twice… What a magnificient piece of art. The polished aluminium fits it better than any paintjob… Thank you very much Paul and Egbert. All the best.

Corey W.
Corey W.

Why so critical people? Photo post editing comes down to a personal taste. She was probably trying to achieve a vintage, slightly over exposed look (though I myself don’t see this fog effect in most of these photos). *shrug* Great pictures. Especially the candid ones. I hope to go someday. Since I stink at accents, I’ll probably dress as a visiting American from that era haha.

Ian Holmes
Ian Holmes

Nice write up, nice photos. But I’d take issue with your assertion that most people don’t dress in period clothing. They may not be wearing true “vintage” clothing. But from what I could see the vast majority of people made some sort of effort. Wether they wore a period military uniform or just threw on a pair of white cotton overalls and smudged some dirt on their faces to pretend to be a mechanic. Or maybe they did what I did and do a bit of research and try to find clothing in a thrift store/charity shop that created the… Read more »

Russ Actonis
Russ Actonis

This is all very well, but if it’s not all about cars, why are half of these pictures of cars? The pictures are not too clear in any case, got a funny fog effect on them, seen a lot of pictures like this lately.

michael shoobridge

Russ, seen a lot of pictures like this lately have you? Try removing your NHS Harry Potter specs and you might see the detail and spirit that these photos actually convey. Or better still, why not get to the Revival and see, smell and feel the atmosphere for yourself. You’re my nomination for boring pedant of the year. Congratulations!

Russ Actonis
Russ Actonis

There’s no need for personal abuse, I’d expected a higher standard of retort from someone like yourself.

robertl eade
robertl eade

I’m with you Russ.
This hazy Instagram/anime style of photography is hard on the eyes.

Andy Cantrell
Andy Cantrell

I looked at the pics pretty hard and I cant see any lack of clarity or haziness, in a couple there are foreground elements that are out of focus but only because the subject is further back and completely sharp. These are great photos and I am surprised Russ and Robert have a problem with them, but I guess if we all liked the same thing it would make for a pretty boring world.

Russ Actonis
Russ Actonis

Thanks Robert, you hit the nail on the head when you say Instagram. It’s becoming, in my opinion, a rather overused effect. I believe the fog to which I referred is an example of where the tone curve has been clipped on the blacks. This causes some loss of detail, particularly in the shadows. In applying this effect, I assume the intention was to make the image stand out or to have an individual style. My conclusion is that it has the opposite effect as it renders the image as compliant with what is becoming the norm in this genre.… Read more »

Oscar
Oscar

You sound like you’ve no idea what you’re commenting on.

Russ Actonis
Russ Actonis

Yeah, right, mai penh rai na.

Ian Miles
Ian Miles

Great photos as ever, capturing the spirit of the Festival. It is amazing to see cars of such a high value being thrashed round a track, get so close to the cars and see so many people entering into the spirit of the festival. Another memorable Goodwood event and unique in the world.