Featured: The Distinguished Gentleman's Ride - Paris Style Edition (2 of 2)

The Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride – Paris Style Edition (2 of 2)

Petrolicious Productions By Petrolicious Productions
October 1, 2014
10 comments

Photography by Laurent Nivalle

Can there possibly be anything more fashionable than Parisian Chic? Well, yes, there absolutely can be, especially when you combine it with motorcycles. Welcome to the 2014 Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride–Paris edition. A photograph of Mad Men’s Don Draper straddling a vintage Matchless motorcycle inspired this international motorcycle event in 2012 with a very good cause at the heart of it–raise money to help find a cure for prostate cancer. This year, participation swelled to almost eighteen-thousand riders in 258 cities around the globe, all riding on the same day for the same cause.

There weren’t many rules, however, the Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride was “founded on classic manners, classic motorcycles and classic trends”, said Mark Hawwa, the event’s Australian founder. Which means that everyone did have to dress up and wear a suit. The bikes also had to be suitably vintage–café racers, touring, cruisers, sports bikes, and even scooters are all welcome. No matter the type of conveyance, the dress code brought otherwise different people together.

And that was the goal of the Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride–to promote a community of riders taking to the streets for an admirable cause. Good job, Paris! Your city is famed throughout the world for its beauty and style…and last weekend, its generosity as well. 265 of you participated, and raised thousands for cancer research. And you did it with Parisian style.

Want to know how their brothers across the English Channel did it? Check out the story, here.

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Diamond Five
Diamond Five

Such a lot of negativity here! It just looks like fun in a good cause.

Paul Davies
Paul Davies

Agreed.

Steely
Steely

Don’t see a problem in having fun and raising some money for prostate cancer research at the same time, I am sure the charities welcome the donations, and it’s money they might not have gotten otherwise. Also those that take part may or may not donate directly too. This hipster playing dress up thing is a load of toss, events have a theme, that’s what gets people involved. Good luck to them I say.

TJ Martin
TJ Martin

Other than an excuse to play ‘ Dress Up ‘ celebrating Halloween a bit early under the pretense of a ‘ Charity Ride ‘ while once again doing the ‘ Hipster ‘ thing of trying to emulate a past they can barely even comprehend : What exactly is the point of these DG events ? FYI ; If you truly want to benefit Cancer research … or any charity for that matter . Do so directly where all your donated money goes to the intended source . Not thru events like these that soak up much of the revenue in… Read more »

Maximo Forcieri
Maximo Forcieri

In these cases “Charity” is more about making yourself feel better, than actually giving a helping hand.
It is all about who donated more and who has the most expensive bike/outfit…

Dont get me wrong, we all like classic bikes and good clothing.. but i dont brag about being charitative just because its “the thing”..

Steely
Steely

Of course it’s partly about making yourself feel better, charities wouldn’t fare too well if those getting involved or donating felt bad about it! You can have fun and raise money you know, it’s pretty much the corner stone of fund raising. Who’s bragging anyway!
It seems that if you want to have a bit of fun, enjoy your toys, get dressed up, raise a bit money for charity, your labeled a hipster these days, if that is true then I must hipster too, better than being a boring cynic.

Jeff Lannigan
Jeff Lannigan

Looks like fun to me, and I find it hard to dislike a $1.5M fundraiser in any form. I bet many could make style judgments of us and our cars, especially in well-shot high contrast black and white.

James Molinaro

Playing dress up is fun. Also, if everyone is a hipster, is anyone? 😉

Serious question though. How much does DGR take from the proceeds raised? From what I understand ALL the money goes to each local prostate cancer research center. With big name sponsors like Triumph I’m pretty sure the “administrative side” is well funded and doesnt need our pennies and nickles.

Matthew Lange
Matthew Lange

It would be nice if the percentage given to charities was stated on their website, but even so looks like a fun event and the charitable element is a nice bonus.

Xavier F.
Xavier F.

What if they wanted to have fun, dress nice and ride? What’s exactly bothering you?