Gear: This Is What Photo-Realistic History Looks Like

This Is What Photo-Realistic History Looks Like

By Michael Banovsky
December 10, 2015
5 comments

“History didn’t happen in grainy black and white…” the narrator says, “and it doesn’t deserve to be remembered that way by future generations.”

Giving history new life is a great goal to have, and by the looks of it, Unique & Limited has turned it into a beautiful business model. Think of it this way: if Hollywood can bring the past to life for an entire movie, it must be possible to bring a single photograph to life, given the right setting, actors, and props. 

What’s interesting is that Unique & Limited then apply digital techniques to further refine the scene before printing everything out on Hahnemühle FineArt Baryta archival paper for long-term display. 

This process has been applied to everything from photo-realistic shots of the greatest moments in Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrows history, to more poster-like (but no less detailed) “Colors of Speed” collection. 

Framed or unframed, Unique & Limited prints look like a great way to appreciate and preserve an arguably more life-like understanding of historic events. I hear they do commissions, as well…

If you’d like to buy a print or see more of what Unique & Limited do, visit its website.

Join the Conversation
Related
0 0 votes
Article Rating
5 Comments
newest
oldest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
patrapofyu
patrapofyu(@patrapofyu)
2 years ago

But can be TellGameStop better for sure.

patrapofyu
patrapofyu(@patrapofyu)
2 years ago

Life is good, MyCFAVisit for me as of now.

Evildad
Evildad(@evildad)
6 years ago

All readers of Calvin & Hobbes know that history DID happen in grainy black and white.

Cristian Isacu
Cristian Isacu(@bierbichl)
6 years ago

Impressive artwork – yes. But it’s artwork, located nowhere in time – you cannot recreate history. History happened, moments in the past, captured on media available in those days – and this belongs to the moment called “history” like the captured content. I also work with digital 3D-models and sometimes feel the passion to create a history-like scene, but it’s only the longing for the “real thing”. That said, you cannot (should not) use the argument, that history didn’t happen in grainy b&w to showcase an artificial “history” to future generations. This is manipulation and lack of respect for those who captured the real thing.

Akın Tekcan
Akın Tekcan(@akin-tekcan)
6 years ago

Incredible