Films: This German Ford Collector Keeps His Fleet Nice And Simple
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Made To Drive | S07 E24

This German Ford Collector Keeps His Fleet Nice And Simple

For Thorsten Seitz, no project is too large in order to preserve his love for the more mundane classics
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Austin Powers
Austin Powers(@austin_powers)
3 years ago

Loved the last Cortina (’62 or ’63?) with the dog-dish hub caps. Sweet ride. Looks like Ford of Europe was definitely inspired by the back end of the ’59-60 Buicks though.

Guy’s got a nice vintage collection.

Paul Fowler
Paul Fowler(@demon0807)
5 years ago

First video I have watched on here. I thought it was bob on. Great subject matter and fabulous production. Nice one 🙂

Nicolas Moss
Nicolas Moss(@itsnicolas)
5 years ago

This video proves that “simple” is not the same thing as “easy”. Mad props! But did I see a surfboard? Surfing off the North coast of Germany? Brrr! Oh, right… simple, not easy.

Robert in LA
Robert in LA(@robert-in-la)
5 years ago

“Holy-moly, converting a four door to a two……Serious respect. ”

Not so easy to get it right, is it? The way he welded in the cross bracing first makes a lot of sense, so that he had a frame that maintained all the dimensions, while he moved the sections over.

These are things that the ‘straw hat’ brigade at Pebble beach do not and never will understand about the car hobby. They see the acres of paint done more beautifully than was ever historically applied to those iconic cars, and miss the rich wealth of detail that the artisan brings to his/her work.

CANYON
CANYON
4 years ago
Reply to  Robert in LA

Not true for a moment regarding Robert suggesting the judging staff at PB aren’t able to ‘understand’ or “miss’ certain issues of detail certain artisans bring to the forefront . There was nothing that escaped the hands and eyes of judges of the like of Phil Hill. Plus Elton Walker or the Stevenson School chaplain (sorry I don’t recall the gentleman’s name ). All of those gents had skills dating way before the times of 50 coats of paint being common. Behind the scenes of tweed,designer clothing,fine wines and the jet brigade.. lay a treasure chest of knowledge and full appreciation of the simpler ways and times.

Robert Hiermeier
Robert Hiermeier(@robhimes)
5 years ago

I love the light grey Taunus he had in his garage. My dad had a 1963 with a four speed on the tree, this was the car in which I learned to drive.

Alexandre Goncalves
Alexandre Goncalves(@cacem)
5 years ago

German efficiency and focus at its best!

CHRIS DAGNOLO
CHRIS DAGNOLO(@cdagnolo)
5 years ago

Petrolicious never fails to impress me and here, you even surprise me with one very….. unique man! Very special, very enjoyable. I don’t really understand this guy (‘I don’t speed’) but I love the fact that he knows what he likes, and he knows why he likes it! Great job as usual!
Chris
Sugar Land, TX

Robert in LA
Robert in LA(@robert-in-la)
5 years ago
Reply to  CHRIS DAGNOLO

I really like Thorsen. I do. I would enjoy having him for a neighbor and seeing how his projects progress, But you know, for a guy who doesn’t need speed, there was the ‘super trap’ exhaust the side by side, two barrel Weber carbs. The wheels, in many cases, were cast aluminum. So he may think that he doesn’t need speed, he is certainly tooled up for it.

Nicolas Moss
Nicolas Moss(@itsnicolas)
5 years ago
Reply to  CHRIS DAGNOLO

He doesn’t like to speed, but he does like to accelerate!

Gonzalo
Gonzalo (@lalorto)
5 years ago

Beautiful cars!In the interview, behind you, there are a beautiful audi (It’s and audi 100?). My father had two of them, and i really like these cars, the car where I learned to drive.

Kenneth Geelhaar
Kenneth Geelhaar
5 years ago

Fantastic job Thorsten on preserving/ resurrecting your two door. I enjoyed your video and thank you for taking the time to explain your automotive passion. I like how you described, “There are people who do it differently, but everyone has to come to terms with himself. I just know that I don’t waste my time on things that aren’t worth it, it’s as simple as that.”. I have changed things on my automobiles in the past that I have regretted later. My end results did not live up to my minds fantasy so I lost interest and sold them. I am glad that you shared why you kept the vehicles true to form and agree.

Christopher Gay
Christopher Gay(@christophergay)
5 years ago

Super nice collection.

I have fond memories of riding with my father through the twisty roads each year to Laguna Seca to see the Monterey Historics back in the early 1980’s.

I always loved that car. Super nimble and super reliable. It could go forever.

Of all the cars that went through, that one should have been one of the keepers, for sure. It was Rangoon Red.

Robert in LA
Robert in LA(@robert-in-la)
5 years ago

Charming. Really lovely. I enjoy the scope of these videos and how you people cover the enormous breadth of serious collecting and auto-restoration.

My first car was that Mark I two door Cortina, with the 1500 Kent I4 engine. The paint was pale blue. And the transmission was a four speed, with floor mounted gear selector. They were wonderful cars for the time. Light weight. Nimble. And a lot of fun to drive. Of course these are exactly the qualities that encouraged Ford to work with Lotus to develop the Mark I for FIA Group 2 Tourist racing.