Reader Submissions: This Citroën Proves That Endangered Classics Are Most Often Normal Cars

This Citroën Proves That Endangered Classics Are Most Often Normal Cars

Petrolicious Productions By Petrolicious Productions
April 20, 2016
8 comments

Story by Max Crozon // Photography by Alex Placet

I’m Max, a French guy of almost 30 years old. The rare car here is a Citroën LN from 1977.

This model is not often seen any more because it was only produced from August 1976 to November 1978, when it morphed into the LNA and became after the LNA. The “A” is for “améliorations,” or “improvements,” in English.

The LN was launched after Peugeot bought Citroën in 1975. The deal was to create a cheap car using existing parts from the two manufacturers. So, the chassis and the body come from the Peugeot 104, the little 602-cc flat twin comes from the Citroën 2CV, the lights come from the Citroën Dyane, and the gearbox comes from the Citroën GS. Almost 130,000 LNs were produced, but as throwaway economy cars, few survive.

My wife’s uncle is a fan of Citroën, and a flat twin addict. He owns two 2CVs; one from the mid-’50s and the other from the early-’80s. He found and bought this LN from an old man who was not driving it anymore.

The first time my wife drove the car in the summer of 2014, she fell in love with it. The color, the houndstooth seats, and the mojo of this late ’70s machine are attractive. So, when we knew that it was for sale, we immediately bought it. We’ve own the car since July 2015, and it’s now a weekly driver. But, in almost 40 years, this LN only rolled about 40,000 kms (~25,000 miles).

We had a baby on May 2015, and sadly, there are no safety belts on the back seat so we can’t drive with him. I particularly love to drive it early in the morning on a Sunday, on winding roads on the Drôme, where we live. On sunny days, I can see the mountains from the Ardèche and the Alps.

It’s beautiful, and it’s a real pleasure to go slowly. We can see the landscapes with another view, now, from our little LN.

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Stuart QuickMark RollsFluoxetineTom HaleBrad DeSantis Recent comment authors
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Stuartq
Stuartq

We can help with the seat belt issue. http://www.quickfitsbs.com

Mark Rolls
Mark Rolls

It’s a classic, the article interested me and got my attention as I had not heard of this car it’s rare and a part of motoring history so deserves recognition as much as any Ferrari or Aston.

Fluoxetine
Fluoxetine

A friend pointed me at this story – I’ve got one of the 4 right hand drive LNA’s left taxed for use on the UK’s roads. Have had the ‘classic or not’ debate before, and I’m not fussed. It brings a smile to my face when I drive it, and that’s the main thing!

Tom Hale
Tom Hale

I love that Guitar Slinger has an opinion. So do I.

This happens to be a lovely classic car and has every right to be labeled as such. Just because it isn’t expensive, prestigious, or built like a thoroughbred doesn’t mean it can’t be a rare classic. Bravo to Max for keeping a bit of motoring history alive and thank you for sharing a charming story!

Maxime Veilleux
Maxime Veilleux

Jolie petite Citroën!

Dommage qu’elles ne se sont pas vendu de côté de l’Atlantique j’aurais bien aimé en essayer une plutôt que de les regarder dans mon écran d’ordinateurs.

Common car are usually the first to go since nobody looks after them.

Guitar Slinger
Guitar Slinger

Well … its a cute little grocery getter and I do understand to a point the authors affections towards the little bugger …. but in truth calling this a ‘ Classic ‘ .. especially an endangered classic is stretching the definition of the word … ‘ classic ‘ well beyond even the worst of the revisionist dictionary’s definitions . To put it bluntly … just cause its old and a bit on the rare side rare don’t make it a classic .. it was updated because it desperately needed it [ which by all accounts didn’t help much ] ..… Read more »

Lms
Lms

Thank God Slanger gave his stamp of approval, so now Max can go ahead and enjoy his “not my Slangers definition” classic. I suppose the ironic use of Classic in the title, which the author even clarifies in said title, was not enough to dissuade Slanger from verbally tossing cookies once again.

Brad DeSantis
Brad DeSantis

Classic, old, antique, whatever. Lets not get hung up on words. Everyone here enjoys older cars and I think should be free to define them as they desire.